Anthracnose

Anthracnose is a serious disease of Annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.)and Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).  The pathogen now known as Colletotrichum cereale, was formerly known as Colletotrichum graminicola.  Although related to some degree anthracnose is associated as either a foliar blight or a basal rot.

 

Foliar Blight

 

Pythium Blight

Pythium blight is historically one of the most devastating diseases of turf.  It occurs during hot, humid conditions of summer and can attack both cool and warm season turfgrasses.  For us creeping bentgrass, annual bluegrass and perennial ryegrass are the most susceptible.  Symptoms often appear in low-lying areas or along drain lines.  The disease often produces a white mycelium during the early mornings and the initial symptoms appear grayish color.

 

Brown Patch

With the occurrence of hot humid weather and nighttime temperatures remaining above 70 F, it is not surprising then to see Brown patch (Rhizoctonia solani)active especially in shaded or low-lying areas. Hot humid weather with nighttime temperatures above 70 F can produce classic brown patch symptoms on creeping bentgrass or creeping bentgrass/Poa annua greens.

 

Classic Golf Hole: The Redan Hole

The Redan hole is one of the most famous, and complex Par 3 designs in golf. Named for a fortress mainly constructed from earthworks, the original Redan hole is the 15th hole at the West Links of North Berwick in Scotland. The design of the hole is credit to the greenskeeper at the time David Strath (1876-1979).

 

Mole Cricket Biology

Article Written by Dr. David Shetlar, The Ohio State University  Mole crickets are highly specialized insects adapted for burrowing through soils. Some species prey on other insects and small invertebrates and other mole crickets feed on plants, primarily their roots. All species damage turf as they burrow just under the turf surface which separates turf roots from soil particles. This can cause the roots to dry rapidly, and lose their ability to take up water and nutrients. This results in crown and top dieback.