Brown Patch

With the occurrence of hot humid weather and nighttime temperatures remaining above 70 F, it is not surprising then to see Brown patch (Rhizoctonia solani)active especially in shaded or low-lying areas. Hot humid weather with nighttime temperatures above 70 F can produce classic brown patch symptoms on creeping bentgrass or creeping bentgrass/Poa annua greens.

 

Classic Golf Hole: The Redan Hole

The Redan hole is one of the most famous, and complex Par 3 designs in golf. Named for a fortress mainly constructed from earthworks, the original Redan hole is the 15th hole at the West Links of North Berwick in Scotland. The design of the hole is credit to the greenskeeper at the time David Strath (1876-1979).

 

Mole Cricket Biology

Article Written by Dr. David Shetlar, The Ohio State University  Mole crickets are highly specialized insects adapted for burrowing through soils. Some species prey on other insects and small invertebrates and other mole crickets feed on plants, primarily their roots. All species damage turf as they burrow just under the turf surface which separates turf roots from soil particles. This can cause the roots to dry rapidly, and lose their ability to take up water and nutrients. This results in crown and top dieback.

Impact of Flooding on Turfgrasses

Heavy rains in the upper Midwest has caused severe flooding especially along rivers and streams.  Golf courses that are located in areas prone to flooding have observed large areas being submerged.  The question often arises to the impact of submersion on turfgrass health

 

Flooding injury as outlined by James B Beard in Turfgrass: Science and Culture) occurs through erosion, deposition of soil, salt and debris to the extent that the turf is killed, and through direct injury of the turfgrass from submersion.

 

Factors that Influence Golf Ball Lie

The golf ball lie is critical to determining the playability of golf course fairways and roughs.  The common definition of golf ball lie is the amount of the golf ball that remains above the turfgrass canopy after the ball comes to rest.  A ball lie where it sits above the canopy produces a clean hit imparting backspin on the ball.  In situations where the ball may sit down into the canopy leaf blades can become the club and the ball causing the ball to “fly” upon being struck imparting little backspin.